Japanese erasers

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Sorry for the out of focus photos. In years past, I had brought to America Japanese erasers that my husband had purchased in Japan over the internet.  They were just so popular.  My aunt requested more, to give as gifts to the little kids she knows.  So here is a huge box them.

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A gun eraser (See, they do have guns in Japan!!!)

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Teeth erasers

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School shoes erasers (This is the style of shoes that Japanese kids wear inside their school.)

If you are interested in purchasing these erasers, check Amazon.

 

 

More shopping in the United States…

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So funny to see these Japanese items here in an American store.    There is a lot more Japanese stuff for sale than when my husband lived in the States during the early nineties.  I think it was hard for him at that time, food-wise.

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My husband could not believe this low, low price!

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If Hello Kitty and Spongebob got married, what would their babies look like?

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Only in America.  I actually sort of want this.

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I bought this toothbrush for myself.  Japan doesn’t have such thrilling toothbrushes.  Toothbrushes are much plainer here.  This toothbrush is like putting a Ferrari in my mouth.

More about Movies

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When we were in the United States, we saw three movies:  “Finding Dory”  “Star Trek 2”  and “The Secret Life of Pets.”

“The Secret Life of Pets” was definitely my favorite because it was so very funny, but all were very good movies and worth seeing.

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We saw this movie poster while in the American movie theater, and my son said, “Is it Chinese or Japanese….?”  I didn’t know.

Well, this movie is American but it is some sort of Japanese tale.  It has since opened in America to wonderful reviews, so we will definitely try to see it when it finally reaches Japan.

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America has different kinds of movie theaters.  I’ve been to regular movie theaters, and dollar theaters (with movies that finished their run), and movie theaters with seats that recline like beds, and the one in the picture is like a restaurant, sort of.  You can order from a menu and they will bring you a meal.  We did that.  But….the meals were very small.  Plus….it’s hard to eat while watching a movie.  I can do one or the other but not both.  So while it was fun, I don’t know if I want to do this style of movie theater again, since it is more expensive than a regular movie theater.

 

 

Fall is here!

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Today is Atumnal Equinox Day.  It’s a national holiday, so no school today.

Over the weekend, we saw two movies at the movie theater: “Ghostbusters” and “The BFG.”  They were both a lot of fun.

There are two movie theaters near us:  Aeon Cinema and Forum.

Aeon Cinema’s website (even though it is in Japanese) is easier to navigate if you don’t know Japanese.

Forum’s website is pretty difficult, I think, if you don’t know how to read Japanese.  However, Forum has more movies in their original languages, and more international movies, so it is a better movie house for us foreigners in Fukushima City.

This is the movie line up for Forum.  (It changes regularly, so I have no idea what movies are on there currently.)

As I write this, it says for the movie, “The BFG:”

BFG ビッグ・フレンドリー・ジャイアント
[字幕]
The BFG
フォーラム3

This movie is in English with Japanese subtitles.  How do I know?  It says that it is subtitled, and I know that The BFG was originally in English.  (If it’s a French movie, it of course will be in French.)

字幕 jimaku=subtitles  (This kanji is what you want to look for on Forum’s site.)

You can remember this because 字 ji means “letter.”



Next let’s look at a dubbed movie, “The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.”

ミュータント・ニンジャ・タートルズ 影(シャドウズ)
[吹替]

吹替 means “dubbed.”

This is the shortened form of the word  吹き替えfukikae=dubbed

So basically this is what you want to avoid if you want to hear a non-Japanese movie in its original language.    I always remember this kanji by looking at the 口in the first part of the first kanji.  (口kuchi means “mouth” so you can imagine a mouth speaking in Japanese.)


There you go!  All ready to go to the movies.   Have a great fall!

Political Climate……..

Approximately two weeks before I left for America, four Dallas police officers were shot and killed by a man in Dallas.   I don’t know the whole deal, but it was during a Black Lives Matter protest.  (You probably remember this if you keep up with American news.)  So my husband was a little, “Is everything okay???? In Texas?????”

My parents live in a conservative neighborhood.   So you’ll see that reflected in the following photos.  This is not a “WeSpeakJapaneseandEnglish” opinion piece.  Just reporting what I see.

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Bumper Sticker  LOL

Japanese people do not do bumper stickers.

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I am 99% sure this “Back the Blue” sticker is in response the slayings of the police officers in the previous month.  So you can understand where this sentiment is coming from.  I even saw a “Back the Blue” sign at a taco fast food restaurant.

(For non-Americans:  Blue refers to the police.)

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An American flag.  My husband came to visit America this time and he said, “Is today a national holiday in America?  Why do so many people have American flags out?”  That’s just life in America.

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A Trump sign.  This is a Trump neighborhood.  I am sure there are Clinton supporters, but mostly very Republican.

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Cat power

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And my opinion is:  Americans are just so opinionated.  But in real American life, people are just so kind.  Nobody’s snarling at other people.  The majority of Americans are very helpful and considerate.

Sam’s Club

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There’s Costco and there’s Sam’s Club.  Both are enormous stores that require memberships for the privilege of shopping there.  Costco is the store for the cool people.  (And Costco, by the way, exists in Japan.)  Sam’s Club is more for the rednecks.   My parents have memberships to both Costco and Sam’s Club, but I think they shop at Sam’s Club more.

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Stepping inside Sam’s Club…..wow, so cavernous.  Echo…echo…echo..echoooooo…..

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Sushi at Sam’s Club.  America has come so very far.  Even rednecks eat sushi.

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Fruits and veggies

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Book section…I always like to look at this section.

My brother used to buy and read Mad Magazine.  I read it, too.   Funny and raunchy, kidstyle.

For a peek at Mad humor:

Here LOL

Here  I doubt he goes to Supercuts.   Too pricey.   His wife probably cuts it.  Which is fine because it will still look better than Kim Jong Un’s haircut.

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CANDY CORN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   The mega size!!!!!!!!!!

Tastes awful, but Halloween isn’t Halloween without it.

Dallas skyline

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Fort Worth is just west of Dallas.  The two cities and their suburbs merge to form one huge sprawling mega city.

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This is the Dallas skyline.   We don’t go into Dallas often.   I think it’s kind of “more” than Fort Worth, more rich more poor more this more that.

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I thought this was fitting to share with you after yesterday’s post.  In Texas, I guess they recently passed a law that open carry of a firearm is legal if one has a license to be able to do so.  So I kept seeing this notice in the above photo.  You can’t enter the building openly carrying a firearm.

One of the big big BIG questions I get in Japan is “Does your family (meaning my American family) have a gun?”

I always play dumb, and go “No, of course not, I have never even seen a gun in my life”.  (Which is actually pretty much true, sort of, basically.)*

But does my my mom have a gun?  Hell no.  She has a curling iron.  She’ll defend herself with that.

But does my DAD have a gun?  Uh, hell yes… He does.  Several I think.  They are put away, I never see them.  My dad grew up hunting and he still occasionally hunts.  He had a bow and arrow until he hurt his arm snapping it…and so yeah when the zombies get here he’ll kick ass.  (Reference to “The Walking Dead” for people who don’t know.)

Do I like guns?  No.  I don’t.  But I am not going to get into that here.  Everybody is entitled to their own opinion.

 

*When I was in Paris walking down the street, somebody was waving a gun around.  Everyobdy scattered from that person.  It wasn’t scary for me because I didn’t realize what was happening until later….but that is my only experience with DANGEROUS FOREIGN LIFE WITH A GUN.  Nothing even remotely similar has happened in America, or anywhere else, to me.

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