In Japan, there are two international stores that I know of:  Kaldi and Jupiter.  We don’t have a Kaldi in Fukushima City.  I really like our Jupiter and feel fortunate to live so close to it.  I don’t actually buy a whole lot there, but it’s nice to have it there when I do want to buy something.

Near my parents’ house in Texas, a similar store is “World Market.”  It sells items from different countries.  Not always cheap though. But I think pretty manageable for a middle class family.

IMG_1659

I found vegemite.  I have never eaten vegemite in my life.

I had been wanting to buy some and take it to my students to try, but Fukushima City doesn’t sell it.  So I saw the Vegemite here in World Market….but it was too expensive.  I did not buy it.  It’s a good thing, too, because on my return trip, I stopped at a store in Ueno Station in Tokyo and found some for about 400 yen (about four dollars.)

IMG_1660

Authentic Japanese snacks….Really interesting for me.  When I was a kid growing up in the United States, Japanese snacks were an impossibility for a kid like me who lived in the Midwest.  Not that I cared.  Japanese snacks weren’t famous or anything at that time.  But I’m sure if I had seen them in a store like this I would have found them interesting and wanted to buy some.

IMG_1661

Traditional soda.  The bottle is glass and there is a glass ball inside that floats around the soda.  We do NOT typically drink this style here in Japan.  Most people don’t.  This is more kind of a special thing, like maybe at a festival.

IMG_1662

Mochi!  However, I think this brand is made for Americans…I have never seen it at all in Japan.  The hint on the package is “Japanese Style.”  In Japan, nothing is labelled that way.

IMG_1663

Some gummies.

IMG_1664

The name in Japanese is Haichu (pronounced Hi-Chew) so this name is clever.  My son likes these candies, but I don’t buy them too often.  He gets enough sweet things.

IMG_1665

German, possibly?

IMG_1666

Seltzer…I tried one…the root beer flavor.  A&W is better!