It’s been a few days since the shooting in Orlando, and I can’t say I am shocked.  Several shootings ago I resigned myself to the fact that there would be shootings like this every so often.   My Japanese teacher today said these horrible shooting occur in America “tabi tabi” and I said “Sometimes?”  She said, “Often.”   Japanese people can’t understand why Americans don’t do something about it, especially more gun control.

I don’t usually follow NHK’s News Easy Web because it’s too easy for me.  (Although regular news for adults are too difficult for me.)  I was looking at this NHK New Easy Web article:

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/easy/k10010555761000/k10010555761000.html

Its title translates as “Prayers for the Dead of the American Nightclub.”

Like I said, I usually don’t learn much from these News Easy Webs, but I did learn an expression from this one:

Dousei Aisya

同性愛者

Dousei=The same Sex

Ai=Love

Sya=Person

Therefore, it means Homosexual People.

That’s an expression that certainly never comes up in my test preparation material.  And it won’t likely be on my test….but here’s hoping!

By the way, you have to be careful with the Japanese word “gei.”  If you hear it on a TV program or a conversation, it probably refers to entertainment.  NOTHING to do with homosexuality.  It’s just a regular Japanese word that is not a loanword from English.

Gei= 芸 = 1.) accomplishments 2.) performance

However, it can be tricky because “gei” written in katakana can also means the same as the English word “gay.”  (Homosexual Love.)


I got kind of sidetracked there.  Anyway, my heartfelt prayers go out to the dead in Orlando and their families.  And all the other multitudes of victims of these shootings that so often occur in the the United States.  It’s pretty obvious that the typical American citizen, while having a right to “bear arms,” does NOT have the right to such extremely high powered arms.  These military weapons did not exist in 1776 so they are definitely not what the Founding Fathers were thinking of when they wrote down the “right to bear arms.”